The YouTube Files – 35 Years Of The Chart Show.

This piece is late because the actual 35th anniversary was in April, but I wanted to take another look back at The Chart Show, as some of the earliest editions turned up online recently. The Chart Show was originally shown on Channel 4 on Friday afternoons, and famously had no hosts, with everything being introduced by computer graphics that were impressive for the time (Top Of The Pops launched their first computer-generated opening sequence around the same time, I wonder if it was a response to this, or a coincidence).

It is always interesting seeing the early days of a show before it is properly defined and settles down into a regular format, and it is clear from these editions that there were too many charts mixed in with some bizarre choices for exclusive videos, although at least it gave some lesser-known acts their three minutes of TV fame. At this point as well as the familiar Heavy Metal (later Rock), Indie, and Dance Charts, there is much more.

These include the Reggae Chart, and the Euro Singles Chart, which featured the biggest hits across Europe, including Sandra, a German singer who never really found fame in the UK, and Stephanie (“is this a duff video or what?”). Then there’s the Compact Disc Chart (albums sold on CD) and The Music Video Chart (compilations of videos and concerts released on VHS). vlcsnap-00010

Then there was the UK Hits In The USA Chart, featuring some successful acts during what was called “The Second British Invasion”. One played was “Addicted To Love” by Robert Palmer that was indeed a chart-topper in America (“can you believe the follow-up to this video is just as bad!”), which in the final edition on ITV in 1998 was rather oddly claimed to be the first video ever shown, when it was actually about halfway through the fourth edition (that honour goes to “What You Need” by Inxs).

And then there was the Network Album Chart, and The Chart File (later Chart File Update), which once featured Cherry Bombz, a rock group fronted by Anita, who used to be in Toto Coelo. Er, yes. The exclusive videos (called Video Reveal at this point) were a rather odd mix, including “World Domination” by The Belle Stars (“these girls used to be shy until they started using hair gel”), the failed attempt to reinvent themselves as a trio (that doesn’t even feature on their best-of).

And there was even Tom Watt (who was best-known at the time as Lofty off EastEnders) and his baffling take on Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues”, where we are informed that “members of The Fall and New Order appear in this vid” and “a big hi to Dick Robins from all at The Chart Show!”. No idea what this was all about, but I’m sure it went down well at his local The Queen Vic.

The show didn’t conclude with The Top Ten, but The Network Chart, showing us some of the hits currently on the up (and not using the official chart like Top Of The Pops did), and The Chart Race, where you had to write in and predict where a few songs would enter the chart. Add to all this the famous video recorder-style graphics, some sludgy-green captions, and the HUD that told us facts that wasn’t on the screen long enough and almost impossible to read anyway.

And then, in June 1986, after barely two months, The Chart Show was rather abruptly cancelled by Channel 4, and replaced by Rewind. Wait, what? Well, there was a return eventually of course, but lots of ideas tried out in the early days were dropped quickly, with the majority of the extra charts featured gone by the end of 1986, and the more familiar format that would run for another 12 years began to take shape.

The YouTube Files – Noel’s Addicts.

Noel’s Addicts (BBC1, 1992)

Over the years I have followed the TV career of Noel Edmonds, and it has definitely had some ups and downs. For every success, there has been a flop. Rather oddly, I have no memory of watching this one at the time, but when I spotted that a couple of editions have been put on YouTube, I thought that I might was well take the chance to find out more.

The idea behind Noel’s Addicts was that Noel would meet various people who were fans and collectors of rather unusual things. This either took place in the studio, or on location, because it’s always good to have a hobby, isn’t it? Whether they were fans of things like pop music, films, or even more unlikely things like clothes, they were all given a chance to explain why they are so fond. vlcsnap-00004

Noel would also often ask guests 12 questions about their favourite thing, and if they get enough right, they really can be classed as an “addict”. There would sometimes be guest celebrities who would talk about their hobbies too, and Noel would also go to America to meet some people with interesting stories to tell. And there was also The History Of Addicts which was hosted by Willie Rushton and his voice, which was accompanied by some of his illustrations. vlcsnap-00006

All of this featured some rather silly captions that went on and off the screen like they did on Top Of The Pops in the early-90s, viewers were encouraged to write in if they wanted to share something about a hobby that they or someone that they knew had, and I couldn’t help but notice that the opening sequence was also rather odd too, with Noel turning into various things. vlcsnap-00005

It’s also rather intriguing that the description for the final edition includes “Nicholas Parsons has a very big surprise for Noel”. I suppose this was the usual end-of-series prank, but this edition isn’t online, I presume Noel had to admit to being a fan of something himself. What could that be? There was only one series of Noel’s Addicts, and rather oddly, the only reason that anybody is aware of the show now is because of the bizarre parody in The Smell Of Reeves And Mortimer.

The YouTube Files – Snooker opening sequences.

Sometimes when you go on YouTube, you fall down the rabbit hole as they say. You plan to watch one video about something, and then you end up watching another, and then another, and you then realise that a lot of time has passed when you had planned to be doing something else. A while ago I wondered if there were any old snooker matches online. I don’t know why really, I just thought that I’d have a look, and I was surprised by how much has been uploaded.

I’ve never been any good at the game (or is it a sport?), but snooker became very popular with viewers for a while in the 80s and 90s. This was because most of the leading players were British and charismatic, and also because matches could easily fill hours of airtime and get good ratings. And of course the launch of colour TV helped somewhat too, marvellous. Every sport on the BBC and ITV seemed be introduced by a famous piece of theme music, along with a veteran commentator who was considered to be “the voice”, and in snooker’s case this was “Whispering Ted” Lowe.

There were also some memorable presenters including David Vine on the BBC, and Dickie Davies on ITV. An account that has uploaded classic frames and matches to YouTube called “mjt_snooker” has complied various opening sequences from over the years from continuity clips, and as the sequences often changed throughout the 80s and 90s, I thought I’d pick out some of my highlights. vlcsnap-00019

The World Championship has been held at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield since 1977, but several other tournaments have been televised too. I imagine that with a lot of these sequences, the designers thought “how can we make snooker look exciting?”. The BBC’s most famous theme “Drag Racer” was introduced in the late-70s. By the early-80s a sequence cleverly featured the BBC2 symbol appearing on a ball. vlcsnap-00020

I liked the sequence used in 1981. This was still before computer animation was really possible, but it did feature some nice airbrushed effects as the balls went into the pockets. Meanwhile, ITV in 1982 had the very impressively-named tournament The Yamaha Organs Trophy, accompanied by the theme “Sprocket Shuffle”. Around this time, the sequences changed almost once a year as the technology advanced. vlcsnap-00021

By 1984 ITV were bringing us The Lada Classic, the one they all wanted to win I’m sure, and a lot of triangles. By 1986, ITV’s opening did feature some computer-generated elements, but this was in the days where the balls looked more like cubes. Also around this time the BBC briefly changed their theme music to “To The Unknown Man”, although that probably wasn’t a popular move. vlcsnap-00028

In 1987 ITV finally had a fully computer-generated opening sequence, with a mildly scary robot man who had things like “access risk” flash in front of his eyes, which was a memorable way to introduce The Mercantile Classic. By the late-80s the music had been changed, and snooker coverage was beginning to fall out of favour on ITV. By the early-90s, the openings became ever more elaborate. On the BBC, a cue on the camera effect was used. vlcsnap-00024

Around 1991 was when the first sequences that I remember were introduced, including on the BBC an unusual camera under the table effect, along with scoreboards flashing and a referee moving the balls around. This was then changed to a nice kaleidoscope effect, and by the late-90s there were people made out of balls and the music had been remixed. vlcsnap-00027

By the late-90s, the evolution to fully computer-generated openings was complete, and coverage could now be moved to the additional BBC and ITV channels, along with coverage on satellite channels including Sky Sports. This meant that ITV were back in the game, with an rather surreal opening sequence where the balls were floating around someone’s head as if they were planets while they pondered their next move, accompanied by “All That Glitters”.

The YouTube Files – Goth Girl.

Goth Girl (YouTube, 2009-2012)

Time for something a little different. This is the first time I have reviewed a show that was made for online rather than TV. In doing this, I might as well reveal something about me. I do seem to rather like women who have a goth/punk look (and I know that goths and punks aren’t the same thing, there is a difference!). But I’m not sure why. Without wishing to overanalyse, I’ve never dressed in that way myself, and I don’t have any interest in the music or culture or anything like that.

I suppose it’s because I do like something a little different and it’s an example of having an extrovert personality (even though I’m as introvert as they come). If you have read some of my pieces, you might have noticed that I have become attracted to some TV shows because they feature representations of such people in the mainstream media, and for a while in the 80s, this became something of a cliche in sitcoms and the like.

Examples include Christine in Home To Roost, Wendy in The Wolvis Family, Mojo in Once In A Lifetime, and even Coronation Street have got in on this with the recent introduction of Nina. And of course, one example in pop music are my old mates Shakespear’s Sister. A lot of people have accused these people of being “fakers” though, and they seem to have become rather annoyed by what they claim is the commercialisation and trivialisation of such imagery.

Now I’m not really interested in the debate of how “real” you have to be if you want to be accepted in a particular tribe or culture. I suppose it’s a way of me saying that I can only deal with the imitators, rather than the real thing. One day, when I decided to try and find some more examples of this online, I came across something that interested me, as I thought that it was real at first, but it was actually a scripted series featuring actors and made for YouTube. The first episode was uploaded over a decade ago, so it was about time that I discovered this. vlcsnap-00098

Firstly, Goth Girl starred Vera Vanguard. Now I didn’t know who this was, but as it’s so easy to find out more information online now, so I had a look, and noticed that she has had a rather varied career. Vera was born in Moscow, and as well as acting, she has also been a model, writer, producer, make-up artist, and has won awards for her cosplay and everything. vlcsnap-00027

Goth Girl is an American series that has a comedy-drama style, and every episode was only about four or five minutes long. The main character is 17-year-old Susan Anderson, who one day decides that she is going to become Selena Ravenvox, and considers herself to be “The Divine Queen”! Selena has multicoloured hair and lives with her parents (her dad often calls her “pumpkin”), and her annoying sisters, Erica and Taylor. I don’t think she ever went down The Batcave though. vlcsnap-00012

Among the other characters are Asteroth, who Selena is in love with (although he isn’t in love with her), Sadisto, who is rather creepy, and her main rival Trinity Divinity. Most of the early episodes take place in Selena’s bedroom (with various posters on the wall). She likes to write a blog about her life (calling herself “an internet blogging gothic goddess”), and hopes that she can influence others. But she is also rather angry, and likes to go around shouting at her parents, punching people and telling them “get out of my face, freakshow!”, causing chaos at parties, and answering her phone with “worship me or die”. vlcsnap-00050

There were 38 episodes of Goth Girl in three series, and it clearly wasn’t big budget, being made in a house rather than a studio set, and featuring about one camera and one microphone too. Vera was also credited as the co-producer and make-up artist. I’m not sure why someone went to the trouble of doing this, but I’m pleased they did. Discovering all the episodes in one go was rather an experience. vlcsnap-00084

All these years on though, some episodes still have barely 1,000 views, so its fanbase didn’t even reach a cult level, and things like the website and social media promoting the show have either long-since expired or closed. I was also rather amused that the final video uploaded to the channel features the writer asking viewers to help fund a fourth series, which didn’t work as this never happened. vlcsnap-00070

I noticed that some of the comments on the episodes consisted of “being a goth isn’t like this!”, Vera has gone on to work on further projects including attending fan conventions in character and various films, and she now has blonde hair, I suppose that she was a faker too. I do have to say though that Selena has definitely joined the list of my favourite (fictional) female goths.

The YouTube Files – Pennis Pops Out.

Pennis Pops Out (ITV, 1995)

A while ago I reviewed The Sunday Show, one of BBC2’s attempts to produce some edgy comedy but in an unlikely afternoon slot. One of the most memorable features was with Dennis Pennis, a character played by Paul Kaye (with an American accent) who asked famous people the questions that nobody else dared to, and had something of an attitude. After a while he became popular enough with viewers to host a spin-off show of his own. I did find a small amount on a tape once, but as some full editions have now appeared on YouTube, I might as well do a review.

Pennis Pops Out (a title that isn’t easy to search for online) was shown late at night at the weekend on ITV (maybe only in the LWT region? Hopefully someone can confirm this). This was a show all about music, but not really the kind you’d find on Top Of The Pops, being closer in style to the likes of Later… With Jools Holland or The White Room. Every week, Pennis, who had a distinctive look including his red hair, glasses, and suit covered in badges, would introduce various bands. There was also an amusing opening sequence featuring Pennis playing the guitar. vlcsnap-00001

This show was made in 1995, which could be considered by some to be the peak of Britpop, and among the bands that performed live were The Lightning Seeds, The Charlatans, and Teenage Fanclub. Pennis would also do various sketches, and interview band members, all accompanied by a rather lively crowd. Who needs to go to a music festival when you’ve got this. If you were rather trendy and read Melody Maker in those days, I’m sure you would’ve loved it. vlcsnap-00003

There was even a phone-in competition to win a goodie bag if you could answer a rather easy question. I didn’t realise that such things were around on TV as early as that. I also spotted some interesting names in the credits. One of the researchers was Brendan “Steve’s brother” Coogan, and one of the executive producers was Danielle Lux, which made me do a double-take. vlcsnap-00004

There was only one series of Pennis Pops Out, and he did indeed go on to host an edition of Top Of The Pops in September 1996. Not long after this though, Kaye ditched the character, because he was becoming increasingly well-known and celebrities were soon trying to avoid his outrageous questions, he was a victim of his own success I suppose. vlcsnap-00005

Kaye did move on to further things though, including sitcom Perfect World, comedy game show Liar, and several drama series. Unfortunately though, Kaye never took the opportunity to team up with fellow comedians Peter Kay and Phil Kay for a fast-paced zany comedy sketch show that they could’ve obviously called… The Paul, Peter and Phil Show. Well I’m awfully sorry for that joke, I’ll go and sit on the naughty step for a while.

The YouTube Files – Stars In Their Eyes unaired pilot.

Stars In Their Eyes (1989)

Being a fan of Stars In Their Eyes (well the series hosted by Leslie Crowther and Matthew Kelly, let’s not think about the later specials and the revival), I had read that there was an unaired pilot made, and I have been interested in seeing that. The good news is that this recently turned up on YouTube, so credit goes to the uploader “Copied Right”.

The pilot is rather different to the familiar format that ran for over 15 years. Firstly, the host was Chris Tarrant. Now as much as I’ve enjoyed his hosting style over the years, I’ve never really been a big fan of his game shows (beyond Who Wants To Be A Millionaire of course), although he always puts a lot of energy into them. And of course, by the time the show did come to ITV in 1990, he had gone. vlcsnap-00001

The basic idea was the same, with ordinary people being transformed into popular singers, and the studio audience deciding who the winner is. There was a different opening sequence and set design, definitely not as classy or shiny as what we’re familiar with. Chris also insisted that this was the sixth edition of the series, although I’m fairly sure there was only one pilot made. Already into the final (supposedly) was Peter the plumber as… Frank Sinatra! vlcsnap-00003

This version was half-an-hour long, and featured four contestants, instead of the usual five. When the contestants were introduced, they stood on the stage, which featured some things that were linked to their work, as if to emphasise how ordinary they were, and that will make their pop star transformation all the more remarkable (this idea was also used in the early series). Just who will they be? vlcsnap-00004

One major difference in the format is that after they announce who they will be (with the catchphrase not in place yet), they then walk over to a rack containing lots of costumes that will help them complete their look. I very much doubt that this is as spontaneous as they make it out to be though. They then go through the doors (not particularly “famous” as yet though). vlcsnap-00007

Then they return, go down some stairs, and walk over to a rather small stage to sing live. Their behind the scenes transformation probably took much longer than it seems. Then the studio audience wave banners including “We Love You, Shirley!”. After all the contestants have performed, the studio audience then vote for their favourite (again, this doesn’t look very authentic at this stage), maybe if they got a full series they would install the proper voting technology (they could’ve borrowed the keypads from Chris’s other game show Everybody’s Equal). vlcsnap-00008

The winner progresses to the grand final, and finishes the show by performing again, as lots of people gather round to offer their applause. In the pilot, the winner was Carol as Alison Moyet (not the same woman was the overall series champion in 1993 as Moyet though). Can you believe it, just a few minutes ago, she was a plain old cleaner, now she’s tonight’s winner. Sometimes, dreams really can come true. vlcsnap-00009

This pilot of Stars In Their Eyes was fascinating to watch. I wonder why Chris didn’t take part in the series, but he did have lots of other shows on the go. Little did they realise at the time that the format (with a few changes that I think were for the better, creating a much more polished show) would be popular on ITV for so many years.

The YouTube Files – Focus North.

Focus North (Channel 4, 1999)

I always like to stumble across unusual comedy shows, even I don’t remember watching them at the time, and I recently saw this on YouTube (credit goes to the uploader Charlie Bowser). The 4Later strand used to feature some rather bizarre shows in the early hours of the morning, and this one (that was usually shown around 1am) definitely fits that description.

There have been many comedy shows that have parodied news presentation over the years, with The Day Today being among the best-known of them, but this one was different enough to manage to get some original ideas out of the genre. Focus North was a parody of regional TV news, and it’s rather clear what the influences were. The show was supposedly produced by Pennine Television, whose ident was suspiciously similar to the one used by Yorkshire on ITV at the time. vlcsnap-00004

And the opening sequence gave me something of a “Channel 3 North East” vibe (the rebranding shambles of Tyne Tees in the mid-90s). The aim was to cover all of the things that were important to viewers. The hosts who were sat on the sofa were Tom Whitelam (Tom Adams, who also around the same time was appearing in those famous “the DFS sale is now on!” adverts), and Shona Lincoln. vlcsnap-00001

Various stories were covered in the regional roundup of the latest happenings, with the hosts seemingly not realising how strange everything was. One item that really stood out to me was about someone who had Clegghead Syndrome, where they are born with an old head that gets younger as the rest of the body gets older, what a strange idea. vlcsnap-00003

There were also some spoof adverts, a look at what was happening around the region, and various technical errors. Tom would also occasionally have some rather odd outbursts, such as turning into the Hulk. Well Fred Dinenage never carried on like this. The show also had a rather large support cast who helped out in the reports, everything was written and directed by a team of three, and it was produced a company that I’ve not seen on TV before or since. Not being from Yorkshire, I wonder if that area is really like this? vlcsnap-00002

There were ten episodes of Focus North in one series, it must’ve been little-seen at the time, but the few that watched did seem to enjoy it, and I can’t really imagine Channel 4 commissioning an original comedy show in such a timeslot now. The style did also remind a little of the type of comedy shows that were being made by UK Play at the time, one of my favourite channels from the early days of digital TV.

The YouTube Files – Blankety Blank USA.

The Match Game (NBC, 1962-1969, CBS, 1973-1979, ABC, 1990-1991)

This will probably be the final original American version of a game show that later came to the UK that I’ll review, but I might go on to consider reviewing some Irish and Australian versions too because I am just fascinated by the world of game shows and I really enjoy putting the pieces together (and I hope that you’ve found them an interesting read too).

There have been several versions of The Match Game going all the way back to the early-60s. There have also been several versions in the UK of Blankety Blank, and indeed there is another one planned to be shown at Christmas this year. I have decided to review the early-90s version. The host by this point was Ross Shafer, and you’ll be pleased to know that he did indeed have a funny-shaped microphone, or maybe it was just the way he walked. vlcsnap-00086

Of course, there were also the six celebrity panellists. It was good seeing ventriloquist Ronn Lucas along with his friend Scorch The Dragon among them. He also had a show on ITV around this time (that I reviewed a while ago), and it seems that he was popular in America in the early-90s too. I presume that he’s still at it, although three decades on he’s probably gone a little mouldy around the edges, and I hesitate to think what Scorch looks like now too, ha. vlcsnap-00088

Also taking part were the likes of that guy who was in the sitcom Out Of This World (also shown on ITV for a short while), along with cast members of daytime soaps like All My Children. Just like in the UK, The Match Game didn’t take itself too seriously, although the format by this time was a little different. Two contestants took part, including a defending champion. vlcsnap-00087

The sextet are given a clue and they all have to fill in the blank, and write their answers on a piece of paper. Can the contestant get a match? There’s $50 for every one. Then there’s the Match-Up round. The contestant picks a celebrity. There are 30 seconds, and for every match they agree on, they win $50. Then it’s back to another round of the regular game. vlcsnap-00089

Then there’s another Match-Up round, but this time there’s 45 seconds, and $100 for every correct answer. The highest scorer goes on to play the Supermatch Game, but nobody wins a chequebook and pen trophy. This round is about the same as the UK version, where the contestant has to guess one of the top three answers. If they get the top answer, they win $500. vlcsnap-00090

In the final, the amount they won in the Supermatch Game is multiplied by ten. They then spin a wheel to determine which celebrity will play with them in the final. If the wheel stops on a double (like in Name That Tune), they could win a maximum of $10,000, an amount that could never be dreamed of in the UK. The contestant has to simply match their answer with that celebrity to win the money, and they could play for five days before retiring undefeated. It was all rather enjoyable.

The YouTube Files – Child’s Play USA.

Child’s Play (CBS, 1982-1983)

This is the original American version of the game show that ran on ITV for about four years in the 80s. And this was yet another one that was hosted by Bill Cullen in his long and distinguished career, I think that this is the third of his shows that I have reviewed, he really did do a lot of them. This version of Child’s Play was slightly different to the format that was used in the UK.

Firstly, it was one contestant against one, instead of two teams of two, so they would not be accompanied by a celebrity panellist who could help them out. Also, there was a defending champion who could appear on up to five shows, so if they kept on winning they might end up earning themselves a rather decent amount of money. And several segments of the studio set span around for no particular reason, which is always great. vlcsnap-00079

The basic idea of the game was to guess the words that were being described by various children (usually aged around seven or eight) who appeared on a rather large screen, mostly on their own, but sometimes in pairs, and of course much of the humour comes from their sometimes rather unusual descriptions that made everyone laugh. If the contestant gets it wrong, it is passed to their opponent who sees the word described by another child. vlcsnap-00082

And if they still don’t get it, it goes back for a third and final child’s description. There is one point for every correct answer. Then there’s the Fast Play round. There are more descriptions, but this time the contestants can buzz in and interrupt the child, if they know the word. Get it wrong, and their opponent can see the rest of the description. There are now two points for every correct answer. Whoever is in the lead when the bell goes wins $500 and goes into the final. vlcsnap-00080

The original format of the final was the Triple Play game. The contestant has to guess six words in 45 seconds, and they can have up to three definitions. Every correct answer won $100, and if they get all of them right, they win an additional $5,000, and also get the chance to squeal right in Bill’s ear with the overexcitement. The format of the final was changed about halfway through the series, as some children now appeared in the studio to give definitions. vlcsnap-00083

There were over 250 editions of Child’s Play that were shown on CBS in the space of just under a year, so they definitely managed to pack a lot in, and some of the children featured ended up being rather famous themselves. As well as the UK, there have also been several versions of the show around the world, although there have been no further revivals of the format in America.

The YouTube Files – Double Dare USA.

Double Dare (Nickelodeon, 1986-1987, 1990-1993, Fox, 1988)

This is the original version of the rather ridiculous game show that came to this country as part of CBBC’s Saturday Morning show Going Live! in 1987. Double Dare launched in America a year earlier in 1986, and helped to establish a game show element in the schedule of the increasingly popular at the time children’s channel Nickelodeon.

This version was hosted by Marc Summers, who had a lot of enthusiasm, but unlike our dear friend the award-winning Peter Simon who hosted the UK version, he also had the gift of being able to walk properly. Two teams of two took part, although there were a few differences to what happened in the UK. Firstly, the teams had names, and they began with a game to get control, cheered on by an overexcited studio audience. On your marks, get set, go! vlcsnap-00074

Questions were then asked (which also appeared on the screen) such as “which president got stuck in the bathtub?”, and they were worth money rather than points. If you don’t know the answer though, you can dare your opponents to have a try, but beware, because they could double dare it back! If still no-one knows, it’s time to play a physical challenge. vlcsnap-00075

This was where the team had to complete a challenge, usually in around 20 or 30 seconds, so make sure that you’ve got your kneepads on. There are usually about two of three of these played per show, so lots of money could be won. Watch out for when the hooter goes though, because that’s the end of part one, and going into the second part, the money values are all doubled! vlcsnap-00076

When the second hooter goes, it’s the end of the game. The losing team take away some consolation prizes though including a bag of Skittles, but the winners progress to play the obstacle course! In the final, there are eight obstacles, that all contain a flag. They have to find all eight of them in 60 seconds, to win some really big prizes. Now it can be done, and it ends up with a big mess everywhere. Repeat for years. vlcsnap-00078

There were also various spin-off series that were shown on a few other channels along with Nickelodeon in America. These included Family Double Dare, Super Sloppy Double Dare, and Double Dare 2000, along with a computer game too. In more recent years there have also been further revivals, along with a stage show that Summers was also involved with.